PROGRAM WORDING…

JEWISH WEDDING:

(cover)
Tara Beth Taff
and
Jake Matthew Levy

August 11, 2007
The Ritz-Carlton, Battery Park
New York City

(page 1-2)
The Ceremony

Officiated by: Rabbi Susie Moskowitz

The Wedding Party:

Grandmother of the Bride and Grandparents of the Groom
Jean Ilowitz, Miriam Levy Pilsmaker and Abraham Pilsmaker

Parents of the Groom
Marjory Lehrer and Dean Levy

Bridesmaids Groomsmen
Jessica Christoferson Michael Christoferson
Meredith Toto Jared Berezin
Michele Mahl Joshua Slater
Yonina Wind Seth Yaffe
Michelle Sckolnick Daniel Fox

Maid of Honor
Jodi Michaels

Best Man
Andrew Berger

Ring Bearer and Flower Girl
Owen and Sasha, escorted by Sean Levine

Parents of the Bride
Alissa and Ross Taff

We wish to share this meaningful day with our grandparents who are no longer with us, but are here in spirit: Sidney Ilowitz, Samuel and Hilda Lehrer, Eliot Levy and Eli and Sylvia Taff.

(middle pages)

The Ketubah
The Ketubah, or wedding contract, is one of the oldest and most essential elements of the Jewish wedding. The Ketubah provides both the bride and groom with legal rights in a marriage and outlines the obligations of the husband and wife to each other, according to Jewish law. The Ketubah is signed prior to the ceremony in the presence of two witnesses who are not related to the bride or groom by blood or marriage. We are honored to have our Maid of Honor, Jodi Michaels, and Best Man, Andrew Berger, as our witnesses for the Ketubah signing.

Tibetan Singing Bowl
Before the ceremony begins, Jake’s mother will sound a Tibetan Singing Bowl, a traditional Buddhist means of calling together the beginning of a ceremony. The chiming of the singing bowl signifies peace and tranquility and invites everyone present to meditate silently for a moment. Singing bowls have become a family tradition, as they chimed at the wedding of Marc Lehrer and Christine Jett, Jake’s uncle and aunt, and at the wedding of Jake’s mother, Marjory Lehrer, to Barry Spiro. We are pleased to carry on this beautiful family tradition at our wedding.

The Huppah
The Huppah is a wedding canopy that has been a part of Jewish weddings for thousands of years. It symbolizes the first home shared by the married couple, a home that they will create together. Keeping with tradition, our Huppah is open on all sides to suggest that our home will be open to all those who need shelter and to allow our family and friends to share in our ceremony. While our Huppah is made of branches and flowers, the roof is covered by a tallis, or prayer shawl. The tallis under which we will be married belonged to Tara’s grandfather, Sidney Ilowitz.

The Wine
In the Jewish faith, wine is used to sanctify all joyous religious ceremonies. Wine is associated with celebrations, festivals and simcha, or joy. We will drink wine from the same cup after the blessing, symbolizing the beginning of our new life together. Sharing from the same cup also symbolizes that married life halves bitterness and doubles sweetness.

Wedding Rings
In Jewish law a verbal declaration of marriage is not binding in and of itself. There must be an act of kinyan – a formal, physical acquisition. Without the groom’s giving and the bride’s acceptance of some object of nominal value – something shaveh p’rutha (worth a penny) – the marriage is not complete. The ring must be free of precious stones to avoid a misrepresentation of its value. By Jewish law, only one ring is required: that which the groom gives to the bride. In more liberal ceremonies, such as ours, the bride’s gift of a ring to the groom is incorporated into the ceremony. During their exchange of rings, Jake will place a ring borrowed from Tara’s family on her finger. Tara’s grandfather, Sidney Ilowitz, was married in this ring many years ago. A band such as Tara’s grandfather’s that is created from a single pure metal with no holes breaking the circle represents the wholeness achieved through marriage and the hope for an unbroken union.

The Seven Marriage Blessings
The sheva b’rachot, or seven blessings, transforms the wedding into a community event. Legally, only two witnesses must be present to make the marriage valid, but ten Jews, a minyan, are needed to recite these b’rachot. The sheva b’rachot provide the community with a glimpse into the wedding ceremony, a time that is filled with peace and love.

Breaking of the Glass
At the end of the wedding ceremony, the groom shatters a covered glass with his heel. While there are many explanations for this tradition, we have selected a few to share here. The broken glass symbolizes the fragility of human relationships. In this context, the glass is broken to “protect” the marriage with an implied prayer: “As this glass shatters, so may our marriage never break.” Even in times of great joy, the married couple must be aware of life’s difficulties. The broken glass can also symbolize the piecing together of the bride’s and groom’s lives as they become one family.

The breaking of the glass is a joyous conclusion that encourages merriment at the seudat mitzvah – the meal of rejoicing – to follow. It is customary immediately following the breaking of the glass for everyone to wish the couple good luck by shouting “Mazel Tov!”

(last page)
To our family and friends,

We are honored and thrilled that you are here to share in our wedding day with us. We are fortunate to have such wonderful, loving, kind and caring family and friends surround us on this day and always. Without your love and support we would not be where we are today.

We would also like to thank our incredible parents and express our love and appreciation for everything they have done to guide us towards this day. Our love for you cannot be expressed in words and we cannot thank you enough for all of the time, energy and hard work you have put into making this evening a truly magical one for us and everyone who joins us tonight.

With lots of love,
Tara and Jake


TRADITIONAL WORDING:

The Marriage Celebration

of

Christine Camille Julian

and

Garrett Barak Moritz

Saturday, the twelfth of January
Two thousand and eight

Saint Ann Church
Wilmington, Delaware

The Wedding Party

Celebrant
The Very Reverend Daniel Gerres

Parents of the Bride Parents of the Groom
Francis and Mary Julian Elan and Patricia Moritz

Grandmother of the Groom
Adeline Smith

Bridesmaids Groomsmen
Amelia Julian MacKenzie Moritz
Lisa Julian Brélan Moritz
Lawrence Ho

The Wedding Ceremony

Seating of the Mothers

Entrance Rite

Processional ………………………..……………………………………… “Canon in D”

Entrance of the Bride ………………………..………………“Prince of Denmark March”

Opening Prayer ……………………………………The Very Reverend Daniel W. Gerres

Liturgy of the Word

First Reading, Genesis 24:48-51, 58-67 …………………………………. Maryann Smith

Responsorial Psalm, Psalm 128:1-2, 3, 4-5
“Blessed Are Those Who Fear the Lord”

Second Reading, Song of Songs 2:8-10, 14, 16a, 8:6-7a ……………..…… Jessica Giblin

Gospel, Matthew 5:13-16

Homily

Rite of Marriage

Exchange of Wedding Vows

Blessing and Exchange of Rings

Lighting of the Unity Candle ………………………..…………… “Prayer of St. Francis”

Prayer of the Faithful …………………………………………………. Mary Rosenberger

Concluding Rite

Final Blessing

Recessional ……………………………………………………”Finale for Water Music”

To our family and friends,

We are honored and thrilled that you are here to share in our wedding day with us. We are fortunate to have such wonderful, loving, kind and caring family and friends surround us on this day and always. Without your love and support we would not be where we are today.

We would also like to thank our incredible parents and express our love and appreciation for everything they have done to guide us towards this day. Our love for you cannot be expressed in words and we cannot thank you enough for all of the time, energy and hard work you have put into making this evening a truly magical one for us and everyone who joins us tonight.

With lots of love,
Christine and Garrett